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Minerva Medica 2019 October;110(5):464-70

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4806.19.05942-1

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Helicobacter pylori infection and the risk of colorectal carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Fan YANG 1, Ying-Lu XU 2, Ren-Fei ZHU 2

1 Department of Intensive Care, Sixth People’s Hospital of Nantong, Nantong, China; 2 Department of General Surgery, Third People’s Hospital of Nantong, Nantong, China



INTRODUCTION: Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that is colonized in the stomach. H. pylori infection can lead to a series of stomach diseases. However, the relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal cancer is currently controversial. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to further understand the relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal cancer.
EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: We conducted a comprehensive retrieval from electronic databases, included the PubMed, Medline, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and China Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform databases (Wanfang Databases) through May 1st, 2018. We used the search terms H. pylori and colorectal cancer or colorectal carcinoma and collected all relevant studies to explore the association between H. pylori infection and colorectal cancer.
EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Twenty-seven studies including 14357 cases were included. H. pylori infection was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. A pooled odds ratio (OR) of 1.27 with a 95% CI of 1.17-1.37 (P<0.001) was calculated by using a fixed-effects model (I2=45.5%, P=0.006). The subgroup analysis revealed that H. pylori infection was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in the subgroups of Western countries (OR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.14-1.57) (P<0.001), serological testing (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 1.08-1.34) (P=0.001), multiple methods of testing (OR=2.63, 95% CI: 1.09-6.31) (P=0.031), cross-sectional studies (OR=1.92, 95% CI: 1.17-3.16) (P=0.010) and case-control studies (OR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.16-1.36) (P<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis provides evidence suggests that a positive association between H. pylori infection and the risk of colorectal cancer.


KEY WORDS: Helicobacter pylori; Colorectal neoplasms; Meta-analysis

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