Home > Riviste > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Fascicoli precedenti > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 April;55(4) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 April;55(4):329-36

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
Per abbonarsi
Sottometti un articolo
Segnala alla tua biblioteca
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Estratti
Permessi
Per citare questo articolo

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL MEDICINE 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 April;55(4):329-36

Copyright © 2015 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Stress related changes during a half marathon in master endurance athletes

Piacentini M. F. 1, 2, Minganti C. 3, Ferragina A. 3, Ammendolia A. 3, Capranica L. 1, Cibelli G. 4

1 Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences,“Foro Italico” University, Rome, Italy; 2 Department of Human Physiology and Sports Medicine, Vrije Universiteit, Brussel, Belgium; 3 Department of Medical Sciences and Surgery, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy; 4 Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy


PDF


AIM: The aim of the present study was to investigate heart rate (HR), salivary cortisol (sC) alpha-amylase (sAA) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) in relation to competition outcome during a half marathon.
METHODS: HR was monitored and salivary samples were collected during an official half marathon in five Master endurance runners (age 47±7 years). RPE was collected using a 100-mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 30 minutes after the end of competition.
RESULTS: Performance corresponded to 94% of their personal best (PB). Athletes spent 53.7% of total race time at intensities above 95% HRmax. RPE showed values of 68±8 mm. With respect to pre-competition values (25.54±6.39 nmol/L), sC concentrations significantly increased (P=0.043) by 59% immediately after the race (40.54±3.95 nmol/L) and remained elevated until 1 h post exercise. Pre-competition sAA concentrations (90.59±42.86 U/mL) were 118% higher (P=0.043) with respect to time-matched baseline values (197.92±132 U/mL). sAA increased (192%; P=0.043) immediately after the race and was higher than time-matched resting samples. The better each athlete performed the greater cortisol increase during exercise (P<0.001). Performance was not correlated to the anticipatory sAA (the percent difference between pre-competition values and time-matched baseline ones) or to the sAA increase during exercise.
CONCLUSION: This is the first attempt to study the stress-related responses during official endurance competitions in master runners. Although the strict criteria of inclusion might have limited the statistical significance, the present findings indicate that endurance competition is a remarkable stressor for psycho-physiological aspects of master athletes.

inizio pagina