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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2014 Oct 06

Copyright © 2014 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Acute effects of a high-volume resistance training session on lung function

Hackett D. A., Johnson N. A., Chow C. M.

Discipline of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, Australia


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AIM: The purpose of this study was to examine whether a high-­volume compared to a low-­volume whole-­body resistance exercise session acutely impairs lung function.
METHODS: Fifteen competitive male bodybuilders (age 27.4 ± 5.4 y; body mass 89.7 ± 12.8 kg; stature 177.9 ± 4.8 cm), in a crossover trial, completed two resistance training protocols (high-­volume: 5 sets per exercise; low-­volume: 2 sets per exercise) and a control session (no exercise) on 3 separate occasions.
RESULTS: The physiological demands of the two resistance exercise sessions were significantly different as indicated by greater VE, VO2, and HR (P<0.05), and lower PETCO2 (P<0.05) responses for the majority of exercises during the high-­volume compared to low-­volume session. No significant differences were found for lung function measures (FVC, SVC, FEV1, FEV3, FEV6, IC, ERV, and MVV) between pre-­ and post-­session for the low-­volume and high-volume sessions.
CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that the ventilatory muscle demands of a strenuous resistance exercise session are not great enough to acutely affect indices of lung function.

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