Home > Riviste > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Fascicoli precedenti > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 December;59(12) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 December;59(12):2009-14

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
Per abbonarsi
Sottometti un articolo
Segnala alla tua biblioteca
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Estratti
Permessi
Per citare questo articolo

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 December;59(12):2009-14

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.19.09639-7

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Impact of rider position and pedaling cadence on power output and bilateral asymmetry in indoor cycling

Javier GONZÁLEZ-SÁNCHEZ, David BARRANCO-GIL , Álvaro FERNÁNDEZ-LUNA, Jose L. FELIPE, Sonia GARCÍA-MERINO, Carlos BARBADO-VILLALBA

Faculty of Sport Sciences, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Madrid, Spain



BACKGROUND: This study examines the effects of pedaling cadence and the rider’s position on power output and pedaling asymmetry during indoor cycling.
METHODS: Participants were 25 male indoor cycling instructors (32.4±4.8 years; 75.7±4.9 kg; 174±4.2 cm) with at least 3 years of cycling experience. In a single session, participants completed 9 training intervals consisting of different combinations of position (standing, sitting), pedaling cadence (75, 100, 120 rpm) and training intensity (75, 80, 85% maximum heart rate, HRmax).
RESULTS: During standing intervals, power output was lower (132.4±72.6 W vs. 197.5±53.5 W; P<0.05) and the bilateral leg asymmetry index was greater (52.2±76.6% vs. 12.4±9%; P<0.05) than when subjects pedaled while sitting for a similar work intensity. In contrast, higher power outputs (238.1±46.3 W vs. 153±52.7 W; P<0.05) and lower asymmetry indices (30.4±39.2% vs. 12.6±11%; P<0.05) were recorded in intervals performed at 75 rpm versus 120 rpm despite similar exercise intensities.
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that at similar training intensities, pedaling while standing during indoor cycling generates fewer watts and greater asymmetry than pedaling while sitting. We also observed that a slower pedaling cadence (75 rpm) gives rise to greater generated power and a lower asymmetry index than a faster pedaling cadence (120 rpm).


KEY WORDS: Bicycling; Exercise test; Sports

inizio pagina