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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 September;59(9):1435-41

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.19.09183-7

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Caffeine added to coffee does not alter the acute testosterone response to exercise in resistance trained males

Taylor M. LANDRY 1, Michael J. SAUNDERS 1, Jeremy D. AKERS 2, Christopher J. WOMACK 1

1 Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA, USA; 2 Department of Health Professions, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA, USA



BACKGROUND: This study investigated the effects of coffee ingestion with supplemental caffeine (CAF) on serum testosterone (T) responses to exercise in recreationally strength-trained males.
METHODS: Subjects ingested 6 mg/kg body weight of caffeine via 12 ounces of coffee (CAF) supplemented with anhydrous caffeine or decaffeinated (DEC) coffee prior to exercise in a randomized, within-subject, crossover design. The exercise session consisted of 21 minutes of high-intensity interval cycling (alternating intensities at power outputs associated with 2.0 mmol/L lactate for two minutes and 4.0 mmol/L lactate for one minute) followed by resistance exercise (seven exercises, three sets of ten repetitions, 65% 1RM, one-minute rest periods). Subjects also completed repetitions to fatigue tests and soreness scales to determine muscle recovery 24 hours following the exercise.
RESULTS: T was elevated immediately and 30-minutes post-exercise by 20.5% and 14.3% respectively (P<0.05). There was no main effect for treatment and no exercise x treatment interaction. There were no differences in repetitions to fatigue or soreness between treatments (P>0.05). No relationships were observed between T and any proxy of recovery.
CONCLUSIONS: While past literature suggests caffeine may enhance T post-exercise, data from the current study suggest that augmented T response is not evident following anhydrous caffeine added to coffee. The duration of T elevation indicates that this protocol is beneficial to creating long-lasting increases in serum testosterone.


KEY WORDS: Caffeine; Coffee; Testosterone; Resistance training

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