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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 August;59(8):1311-8

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.19.09190-4

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Contribution of select physiological variables to sprint triathlon performance

Thomas PAPAVASSILIOU , Elias ZACHAROGIANNIS, Helen SOULTANAKIS, George PARADISIS, Fotini DAGLI PAGOTTO

School of Physical Education and Sport Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece



BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between select physiological variables and sprint triathlon performance.
METHODS: Moderately trained male triathletes (N.=15) performed two graded maximal exercise tests, on a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. Anaerobic capacity was evaluated, on a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. Within two weeks before or after the testing, all triathletes participated in a sprint triathlon race (750 m sea swim, 20 km cycle, 5 km run).
RESULTS: The results showed that significant correlations exist between VO2max during cycling (r=-0.811, P<0.05) or running (r=-0.757, P<0.05) and overall triathlon performance. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, with triathlon performance as the dependent variable and the physiological measures during running as the independent variables, showed that VO2max (mL.min-1.kg-1), Time_CF, CHO_rate @ VT and % body fat yielded the best prediction of performance (R2=0,912). When only the physiological variables from cycling were included into the model, the results showed that VO2max (mL.min-1), VO2max (mL.min-1.kg-1) and PFmax (rpm) explained 88% of the variation in sprint triathlon performance.
CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that overall race time for moderately trained triathletes, competing over the sprint distance can be accurately predicted from maximal laboratory tests.


KEY WORDS: Running; Bicycling; Athletic performance

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