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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 July;59(7):1133-7

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.18.08861-8

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Monitoring heart rates to evaluate pacing on a 75-km MUM

Pascal BALDUCCI 1 , Damien SABOUL 1, 2, Robin TRAMA 1

1 Inter-University Laboratory of Human Movement Science, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Villeurbanne, France; 2 Be-Studys, Châtelaine, Genève, Switzerland



BACKGROUND: To examine pacing among twelve males on a 75-km mountain ultra marathon (MUM) and to determine whether pacing relates to final performance.
METHODS: Speed and heart rates (HR) were measured continuously using a HR monitor and a global position system device. An Index of Pacing (IP) was calculated by dividing the average race speed by the speed on the first race segment. In addition, percentage (%) of heart rate reserve (HRres), coefficient of variation (CV) in speed and in percentage of HRres were analyzed throughout the race.
RESULTS: Performance time was correlated with IP (r=-0.88, P<0.01), % of HRres (r=- 0.72, P<0.05), and CV in % of HRres (r=0.80, P<0.05), but not with CV in speed (r=-0.12, P=0.9). On the entire race, evolution of HR was not dependent on the elevation gain.
CONCLUSIONS: Tracking HR is a safer way to rate pacing than speed tracking on a hilly course.


KEY WORDS: Athletic performance; Endurance training; Sports

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