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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL MEDICINE 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2019 June;59(6):1036-44

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.18.08864-3

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Autonomic modulation and baroreflex sensitivity after acute resistance exercise: responses between sexes

J. Derek KINGSLEY 1, Yu-Lun TAI 1 , Erica M. MARSHALL 1, Alaina GLASGOW 1, Ramon OLIVEIRA 2, Jason C. PARKS 1, Xian MAYO 3

1 Cardiovascular Dynamics Laboratory, Exercise Physiology, Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA; 2 Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil; 3 Observatory of Healthy & Active Living of Spain Active Foundation, Center for Sport Studies, King Juan Carlos University, Madrid, Spain



BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomic modulation, blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) responses to an acute bout of free-weight resistance exercise in resistance-trained men (N.=14) and women (N.=13).
METHODS: Participants underwent both an acute bout of resistance exercise (RE) consisting of 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% 1-repetition maximum on the squat, bench press, and deadlift, and a quiet control. Autonomic modulation, blood pressure variability (LFSAP), and cardiovagal BRS were assessed at rest, 15-20 minutes (Rec1) and 25-30 minutes (Rec2) postexercise. Log transformed measures of autonomic modulation included root square of the mean ssquared differences of successive RR intervals (LnRMSSD), high-frequency power (LnHFRR) and low-frequency power (LnLFRR) and sympathovagal balance (LnLFRR/HFRR). LFSAP was used as a measurement of vasomotor tone. Cardiovagal BRS was assessed using the sequence method.
RESULTS: There were no significant sex differences at rest and no significant sex by time by condition interactions for any variable. Compared with rest there were augmentations in LnLFRR/HFRR (P=0.002) and LFSAP (P=0.001) at Rec1 and Rec2. RMSSD and cardiovagal BRS were significantly (P=0.0001) decreased at Rec1 and Rec2 compared to rest after the acute RE.
CONCLUSIONS: Both sexes demonstrated that acute resistance exercise using free weights has a profound impact on autonomic modulation, blood pressure variability and cardiovagal BRS.


KEY WORDS: Heart rate; Blood pressure; Baroreflex; Exercise; Sex

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