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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 November;58(11):1572-81

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07634-4

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Within-person relationship between self-efficacy and performance across trials: effect of task objective and task type

Teri J. HEPLER 1 , Jason RITCHIE 2, Christopher R. HILL 3

1 Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI, USA; 2 Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA; 3 Department of Kinesiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA



BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy has been shown to be a consistent, positive predictor of between-persons performance in sport. However, there have been equivocal results regarding the influence of self-efficacy on a person’s performance over time. This study investigated the influence of self-efficacy on motor skill performance across trials with respect to two different task objectives and task types.
METHODS: Participants (N.=84) performed 4 blocks of 10 trials of a dart throwing (closed skill) and a hitting (open skill) task under 2 different task objectives: competitive and goal-striving. For the goal-striving condition, success was defined as reaching a predetermined performance level. The competitive condition involved competing against an opponent.
RESULTS: Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine the influence of past performance and self-efficacy on the within-person performance across multiple trials. Previous performance was negatively related with subsequent performance on all conditions. Self-efficacy was not a significant predictor of performance on any of the conditions.
CONCLUSIONS: While task objective and task type did not moderate the efficacy-performance relationship in the current study, it is important to consider the role of other moderators in future research.


KEY WORDS: Sports - Performance - Motor skills

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