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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2018 January-February;58(1-2):43-9

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.16.06792-X

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Effects of a trail mountain race on neuromuscular performance and hydration status in trained runners

Ernest BAIGET 1 , Javier PEÑA 1, Xantal BORRÀS 1, Toni CAPARRÓS 1, José L. LÓPEZ 1, Francesc MARIN 1, Jordi COMA 1, Eduard COMERMA 2

1 Sport Performance Analysis Research Group, University of Vic, Barcelona, Spain; 2 Department of Physical Activity Sciences, University of Vic, Barcelona, Spain


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BACKGROUND: The aims of this study were to examine the effects of a trail mountain race (TMR) on hydration status and neuromuscular performance of recreational trail runners, and to determine the relationship among these parameters, subject’s characteristics and competitive performance.
METHODS: Thirty-five male recreational trail runners (age 38.1±9.5 years; height 177.3±5.8 cm; body mass 73.8±8.4 kg) were assessed before and after a 21.1-km TMR. Hydration status (urine color [Ucol] and body mass [BM]) and neuromuscular performance (countermovement jump [CMJ] and rebound jumps [RJ]) were assessed.
RESULTS: Significant changes following the TMR included RJ mean contact time (RJMCT) (12%, ES=-0.35, P<0.05) and dehydration status increases (BM reductions -2.7%, ES=0.24, P<0.001; Ucol: 147% increase, ES=-1.8, P<0.001). Low to moderate positive correlations were found between pre- and post-TMR BM (r=0.5-0.54; P<0.01), post-race Ucol (r=0.37; P<0.05), age (r=0.57; P<0.01) and TMR performance. Participants’ age combined with Ucol and the RJMJH post-TMR, explained 65% of the variance in the final running time (r=0.81; P=0.000).
CONCLUSIONS: Participation in a 21.1-km TMR in recreational runners results in small reductions of the neuromuscular function and increases in dehydration levels. The hydration status (Ucol) and the RJMJH post-TMR combined with the runners’ chronological age seemed to be good predictors of the final running performance.


KEY WORDS: Running - Dehydration - Muscle strength

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