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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

Rivista di Medicina, Traumatologia e Psicologia dello Sport


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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2017 October;57(10):1245-51

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.06896-7

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Energy requirements of tire pulling

Per M. FREDRIKSEN, Asgeir MAMEN

Kristiania University College, Institute of Health Sciences, Oslo, Norway


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BACKGROUND: We have investigated the effect using walking poles and pulling tires at 4 and 6 km·h-1 (1.11 and 1.67 m·s-1) speeds on oxygen uptake (V̇O2) and heart rate.
METHODS: Eleven subjects, 6 males, with a mean (SD) age of 25.2 (6.9) years participated in field tests involving walking without poles, walking with poles and tire pulling with poles.
RESULTS: Increasing the load caused the largest increases in energy demand, more than 4 MET. Speed increase also caused substantial energy increase, approximately 4 MET. Increasing the inclination only modestly increased the oxygen uptake, approximately 2 MET. In both level walking and uphill walking, using poles marginally increased oxygen uptake compared to working without poles. Pulling one tire (12.5 kg) required an oxygen uptake of 27 (4) mL·kg-1·min-1 at 4 km·h-1 and 0% inclination. Adding one more tire (6 kg) drove the oxygen uptake further up to 39 (4) mL·kg-1·min-1. This is close to the requirement of level running at 10.5 km·h-1. Pulling both tires at 6 km·h-1 and 5% inclination required a V̇O2 of 54 (6) mL·kg-1·min-1, equal to running uphill at 5% inclination and 12.5 km·h-1 speed. Heart rate rose comparably with oxygen uptake. At 4 km·h-1 and 0% inclination the increase was 29 bpm, from 134 (21) to 163 (22) bpm when going from pulling one tire to two tires. In the hardest exercise, 6 km·h-1 and 5% inclination, heart rate reached 174 (14) bpm.
CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that tire pulling even at slow speeds has an energy requirement that is so large that the activity may be feasible as endurance training.


KEY WORDS: Physical fitness - Exercise test - Exercise tolerance

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Publication History

Issue published online: August 30, 2017
Article first published online: February 14, 2017
Manuscript accepted: January 23, 2017
Manuscript revised: January 16, 2017
Manuscript received: August 3, 2016

Per citare questo articolo

Fredriksen PM, Mamen A. Energy requirements of tire pulling. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2017;57:1245-51. DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.06896-7

Corresponding author e-mail

asgeir.mamen@kristiania.no