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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2017 May;57(5):550-5

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.16.06227-7

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Effects of plyometrics performed during warm-up on 20 and 40 m sprint performance

Ceith C., CREEKMUR 1, Joshua L. HAWORTH 2, Ronald H. COX 3, Mark S. WALSH 3

1 Athletic Department, Michigan State University, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2 Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3 Department of Kinesiology and Health, Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA


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BACKGROUND: Postactivation potentiation in the form of a plyometric during warm-ups have been shown to improve performance in some speed/power events. This study aimed to determine if a plyometric during warm up can increase sprint performance in a 20 and 40 m sprint.
METHODS: In this study we measured sprint times of 10 male track and field athletes over distances of 20 and 40 m after warm-ups with and without a plyometric exercise. The subjects performed the sprints at the same time on 2 different days, once with the experimental treatment, a plyometric exercise in the form of a plate jump, and once without. Plate jumps were chosen as the plyometric treatment because they do not require special equipment or facilities. The plate used for the plate jumps had a mass of 11.2 kilograms, which was between 12.8-16.6% of each athlete’s body mass.
RESULTS: Statistical analysis showed a decrease in sprint time when a plyometric was performed during the warm-up for both 20 (t-test P<0.05) and 40 m sprints (t-test P<0.01). The effect sizes of the improvement for both the 20 and 40 m sprints were d=0.459 and d=0.405, respectively, which is considered a small to medium effect.
CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that including a plyometric exercise during warm-ups can improve sprint performance in collegiate aged male sprinters during short sprints.


KEY WORDS: Plyometric exercise - Track and field - Warm-up exercise

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