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ORIGINAL ARTICLES  PSYCHOLOGY 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 July-August;56(7-8):939-48

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

When efficacy beliefs affect team attributions: relationships between self- and collective efficacy beliefs and team attributions over time

Veronica SON 1, Jihye CHUNG 2, Jae P. YOM 3

1 Division of Kinesiology and Sport Management, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, USA; 2 Department of Physical Education, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul, South Korea; 3 School of Applied Health Science and Wellness, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA


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BACKGROUND: This study investigated the extent to which efficacy beliefs and perceptions of team performance influenced team causal attributions overtime.
METHODS: A total of 258 undergraduate students were assigned to a three or four person team and played three games against three different opponents in a semi-round robin team bowling tournament.
RESULTS: Multilevel modelling analyses revealed that individuals’ perceptions in team performance were positively associated with internal, stable, and team controllable attributions. Collective efficacy beliefs positively predicted team attributions overtime; whereas, self-efficacy beliefs were a negative predictor of team attributions across the tournament.
CONCLUSIONS: The results indicated that individuals’ perceptions of their team’s success/failure were the stronger determinant of team attributions than their team’s winning/losing and, as well as, the efficacy beliefs – team attributions relationships were moderated by time.

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