Home > Riviste > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Fascicoli precedenti > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2013 December;53(6) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2013 December;53(6):701-12

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
Per abbonarsi PROMO
Sottometti un articolo
Segnala alla tua biblioteca
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Estratti
Permessi

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2013 December;53(6):701-12

Copyright © 2013 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Affective responses to self-selected and imposed walking in inactive women with high stress: a pilot study

Wardwell K. K. 1, Focht B. C. 1, Courtney Devries A. 2, O’connell A. A. 3, Buckworth J. 1

1 Health and Exercise Physical Activity and Educational Services The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 2 Department of Neuroscience Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 3 Quantitative Research, Evaluation, and Measurement, School of Educational Policy and Leadership, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA


PDF


Aim: The primary purpose was to examine affective responses and future intentions in response to self-selected and imposed-intensity walking in inactive women with high levels of stress. The secondary purpose was to examine potential psychobiological variables (cortisol responses and self-efficacy) associated with changes in affective states.
Methods: Nineteen participants (age=23.58±5.30 yr) completed three trials of treadmill walking at self-selected intensity, 10% above and 10% below relative self-selected intensity. Walking duration was determined to expend 150 kcal. Affective responses and salivary cortisol were measured prior to, during, and following walking sessions. Self-efficacy was also measured during and post-walking. Future intention was measured post walking.
Results: Affect and self-efficacy improved significantly over time at all walking intensity conditions. Moreover, selected affect variables were improved at self-selected but not at imposed intensity during and post walking. No significant associations were observed between affect, self-efficacy and cortisol levels. However, affect and self-efficacy did significantly predict future intentions.
Conclusion: Treadmill walking at intensities proximal to and lower than ventilatory threshold were associated with positive affective responses during and after walking in women with high levels of stress. Self-selected intensity may be effective for eliciting more favorable experiences during and following acute bouts of exercise, and promote future intentions for exercise. Findings provide partial support for self-efficacy during exercise as a potential mechanism for positive affective responses, especially at self-selected intensity.

inizio pagina