Home > Riviste > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Fascicoli precedenti > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2010 March;50(1) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2010 March;50(1):25-31

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
Per abbonarsi PROMO
Sottometti un articolo
Segnala alla tua biblioteca
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Estratti

 

Original articles  PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANISMS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2010 March;50(1):25-31

Copyright © 2010 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Oxygen cost of sprint training

Berg K., Buresh R., Parks L., Kissinger K., Karasek D., Sinnett A., Trehearn T.

University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA


PDF


AIM: The purpose of the study was to profile the oxygen uptake of sprinters during various portions of a typical sprint training workout.
METHODS: This was a descriptive study of 11 female sprinters and jumpers on an NCAA Division II university track team. Subjects were assessed for V.O2max, and V.O2 and HR kinetics during a 65 min typical sprint training session on a treadmill. The sprint session included a warm-up, static stretching, acceleration runs, 8x20 s sprints at 150% of velocity V.O2max (vV.O2max) with a 3-min walk recovery, and a cool-down.
RESULTS: Mean V.O2 and HR (M±SD) for the entire 65 min sprint training session were 19.1±7.6 mL/kg/min and 138.7±24.0 b/min, respectively. V.O2 rose to 33 mL/kg/min during and immediately following each 20 s sprint which represented 73% of V.O2max. V.O2 during and after each sprint remained nearly constant (P>0.05) rather than rising as hypothesized.
CONCLUSION: V.O2 during a 65 min sprint training workout in female college athletes varies greatly but was elevated to 33 mL/kg/min following each 20 s sprint. V.O2 did not rise across the series of eight sprints. These results suggest that chronic sprint training may elicit a moderate aerobic training effect. Implications for training are discussed.

inizio pagina