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ORIGINAL ARTICLES  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2009 March;49(1):30-4

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Are physiological characteristics of Caribbean dance useful for health?

Di Blasio A. 1, 2, De Sanctis M. 2, Gallina S. 1, 2, Ripari P. 1, 2, 3

1 Department of Human Movement Sciences G. d’Annunzio University, Chieti, Italy 2 Faculty of Motor Science Education G. d’Annunzio University, Chieti, Italy 3 University Centre of Sports Medicine G. d’Annunzio University, Chieti, Italy


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Aim. Although the current literature underlines the main role of physical inactivity in the development of chronic diseases and premature death, 65% of adults do not reach the minimum movement levels required to maintain and improve health. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the metabolic and cardiocirculatory characteristics of a single lesson of Caribbean dance fit with international recommendations to improve health through movement.
Methods. Energy expenditure, exercise intensity, mean heart rate and blood pressure response to a 90-minute lesson were analysed in 24 beginner and 24 experienced dancers (mean age 33.93±9.98 years).
Results. MANCOVA was used to analyse energy expenditure and exercise intensity of our sample, stratified for gender and experience. Body weight was inserted as a covariate. Experienced had a major total energy expenditure (372.75± 75.32 vs 297.33±87.54 kcal; P<0.001), minutes of exercise intensity >6 metabolic equivalents (METs) (8.04±10.65 vs 1.47±2.16; P<0.001), mean METs (3.81±0.32 vs 3.42±0.37; P<0.05) and mean heart rate (60.68±1.35 vs 53.24±3.91 %HRR; P<0.001) than beginner dancers. There were no statistical differences in blood pressure values.
Conclusion. Caribbean dance fits with international guidelines to improve health and can aid the promotion and enhancement of health through its physiological characteristics, and may reduce drop-out due to a reduced motivation to move.

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