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Original articles  BODY COMPOSITION, SPORT NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION (ergogenics) 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2006 September;46(3):454-7

Copyright © 2006 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Effect of a maximal treadmill test on percent body fat using leg-to-leg bioelectrical impedance analysis in children

Andreacci J. L. 1, Dixon C. B. 2, Lagomarsine M. 1, Ledezma C. 1, Goss F. L. 3, Robertson R. J. 3

1 Department of Exercise Science Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA, USA 2 Department of Health Science Lock Haven University, Lock Haven, PA, USA 3 Center for Exercise and Health-Fitness Research University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA


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Aim. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of a maximal treadmill exercise test on percent body fat (%BF) in children using leg-to-leg bioelectrical impedance analysis (LBIA) (Tanita Model #TBF-300A).
Methods. Fifty-four children (24 females; 30 males) between 7-10 years of age participated in this study. LBIA measures of %BF were obtained immediately before and within 5 min after completing a maximal oxygen consumption test on a motorized treadmill.
Results. No pre- to post-test differences in %BF were observed in either group (mean difference: females 1.6%, males 1.5%). Impedance values significantly decreased postexercise (P<0.05) in the female subjects. No significant differences were observed for fat mass, fat free mass, total body water or body weight postexercise when compared to pre-exercise values in either group. Correlations (P=0.0001) of 0.997 were observed between pre- and postexercise measures of %BF.
Conclusions. A maximal treadmill exercise test conducted prior to LBIA has no impact on %BF in children. Therefore, normal daily activities performed prior to LBIA assessment may have a limited impact on LBIA body composition measurement in children. As such, compliance with stringent pretesting exercise guidelines may not be essential when using LBIA to assess %BF in children.

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