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Original articles  BIOCHEMISTRY 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2005 September;45(3):419-23

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Effect of exercise duration on plasma endothelin-1 concentration

Davis P. G. 1, 2, Ferguson M. A. 1, Alderson N. L. 1, Pate R. R. 1, Bodary P. F. 1, Durstine J. L. 1

1 Department of Exercise Science The University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA 2 Department of Exercise and Sport Science The University of North Carolina at Greensboro Greensboro, NC, USA


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Aim. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstricting peptide released mostly from vascular endothelial cells. Isolated exercise sessions of relatively long duration (≥30 min) have produced increases in plasma ET-1 concentration while shorter exercise sessions usually have not. The purpose of the present study was to verify an effect of exercise duration at a steady work rate on plasma ET-1 concentration.
Methods. Eleven endurance-trained males (age 27±6 years; maximal oxygen consumption—V.O2max—56±7 mL·kg-1·min-1, body fat 11±5%; mean±SD) exercised on a treadmill at 70% V.O2max on 2 occasions separated by at least 2 weeks. During a short-duration session, subjects expended approximately 3 360 kJ (60±2 min). During a long-duration session, subjects expended approximately 6 300 kJ (112±4 min). Six of the subjects performed the 3 360 kJ session before the 6 300 kJ session while the other 5 subjects performed the 6 300 kJ session first.
Results. The short-duration session did not cause plasma ET-1 concentration to change immediately after exercise (0.23±0.01 pmol·L-1 before exercise, 0.22±0.02 pmol·L-1 after exercise, mean±SE). However, 10 of 11 subjects had increased ET-1 after the long-duration session (0.28±0.02 pmol.L-1 before exercise, 0.32±0.02 pmol·L-1 after exercise, P=0.0004). A treatment-by-time effect was present (P=0.003).
Conclusion. These results demonstrate an effect of exercise duration on plasma ET-1 concentration. Exercise duration is, therefore, an essential consideration when investigating exercise’s effect on ET-1.

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