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Original articles  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2004 June;44(2):111-8

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

The effects of rest interval length and training on quadriceps femoris muscle. Part I: Knee extensor torque and muscle fatigue

Pincivero D. M. 1, Campy R. M. 2

1 Human Performance and Fatigue Laboratory Department of Kinesiology The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA 2 Department of Physical Education, Health and Recreation Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA, USA


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Aim. ­The pur­pose of ­this ­study was to ­examine the ­effects of ­rest ­interval on quad­ri­ceps fem­oris (QF) ­muscle ­strength and ­fatigue ­during ­short-­term, ­high-inten­sity ­training.
­Methods. Fif­teen ­healthy ­males were ­assessed for iso­ki­netic QF ­strength, via ­peak ­torque (PT), ­work (WK) and ­power (PW), at a pre-set ­angular ­velocity of 180 deg•s-1. Quad­ri­ceps fem­oris ­muscle ­fatigue was eval­u­ated as the ­decline in iso­ki­netic ­work and ­power (­slope) ­across 30 max­imal con­cen­tric con­trac­tions. Sub­jects ­were ran­domly ­assigned to 1 of 3 ­groups: ­Group 1 (short ­rest ­interval), ­Group 2 (­long ­rest ­interval), and ­Group 3 (con­trol-no ­training). Sub­jects in ­Group 1 ­received a ­rest ­period of 40 s in ­between exer­cise ­sets cor­re­sponding to a 2:1 ­rest:­work ­ratio. Sub­jects in ­Group 2 ­received a ­rest ­period of 160 s cor­re­sponding to an 8:1 ­rest:­work ­ratio. ­Groups 1 and 2 per­formed iso­ki­netic ­knee exten­sion con­trac­tions at 180 deg•s-1 2 ­days per ­week for 6 ­weeks.
­Results. The ­results dem­on­strated a sig­nif­i­cant ­increase in QF ­muscle PT ­across the 6 ­week ­training ­period in the ­long ­rest ­interval ­group, and no ­signifìcant ­changes in the ­short ­rest ­interval and con­trol ­groups. Quad­ri­ceps fem­oris ­muscle ­work and ­power ­were ­observed to not ­change signi­fi­cantly ­across the ­training ­period in all 3 ­groups. The reduc­tion in QF ­muscle ­work ­across the ­single set of 30 rep­e­ti­tions was ­observed to ­decrease sig­nif­i­cantly in the con­trol ­group ­across the 6 ­week dura­tion; no ­other sig­nif­i­cant ­changes in QF ­muscle ­fatigue for ­work and ­power ­were ­observed.
Con­clu­sion. The ­major find­ings of ­this ­study sug­gests that the pos­sibility of dif­ferent phys­io­log­ical mech­a­nisms of adap­ta­tion ­exist for QF ­muscle ­peak ­torque, ­work and ­power, ­while ­changes in ­muscle ­fatigue resis­tance may be ­present ­when ­assessed ­across mul­tiple, ­rather ­than a ­single, ­bouts of ­activity.

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