Home > Riviste > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Fascicoli precedenti > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2004 March;44(1) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2004 March;44(1):98-103

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
Per abbonarsi
Sottometti un articolo
Segnala alla tua biblioteca
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Estratti

 

Original articles  NEUROPHYSIOLOGY 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2004 March;44(1):98-103

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

The muscle strength and bone density relationship in young women: dependence on exercise status

Taaffe D. R. 1, Marcus R. 2

1 School of Human Movement Studies University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia 2 Department of Medicine Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA


PDF


Aim. Numerous stud­ies ­report an asso­ci­a­tion ­between mus­cle ­strength and ­bone min­er­al den­sity (BMD) in ­young and old­er wom­en. However, the par­tic­i­pants are gen­er­al­ly non-ath­letes, ­thus it is ­unclear if the rela­tion­ship var­ies by exer­cise stat­us. Therefore, the pur­pose was to exam­ine the rela­tion­ships ­between BMD and mus­cle ­strength in ­young wom­en ­with mark­ed­ly dif­fer­ent exer­cise lev­els.
Methods. Experimental ­design: ­cross-sec­tion­al. Setting: a University ­research labor­a­to­ry. Participants: 18 col­le­giate gym­nasts and 22 age- and ­weight-­matched recrea­tion­al­ly ­active con­trol wom­en. Measures: lum­bar ­spine, femo­ral ­neck, arm, leg and ­whole ­body BMD (g/cm2) ­were ­assessed by ­dual X-ray absorp­tiom­e­try. In addi­tion, lum­bar ­spine and femo­ral ­neck ­bone min­er­al appar­ent den­sity (­BMAD, g/cm3) was cal­cu­lat­ed. Handgrip ­strength and ­knee exten­sor and flex­or ­torque (60°/s) ­were deter­mined by dyna­mom­e­try, and ­bench ­press and leg ­press ­strength (1-RM) ­using iso­ton­ic equip­ment.
Results. BMD at all ­sites and ­bench ­press, leg ­press and ­knee flex­or ­strength ­were great­er in gym­nasts ­than con­trols (p<0.001). In con­trols, ­knee exten­sor ­torque was sig­nif­i­cant­ly cor­re­lat­ed to femo­ral ­neck, ­limb and ­whole ­body BMD (r=0.47-0.55, p<0.05), leg ­press ­strength was asso­ciat­ed ­with ­limb and ­whole ­body BMD (r=0.52-0.74, p<0.05), and ­bench ­press ­strength ­with arm BMD (r=0.50, p=0.019). In par­tial cor­re­la­tions con­trol­ling for ­weight, leg ­press ­strength was relat­ed to leg and ­whole ­body BMD (r=0.46-0.63, p<0.05). There was no asso­ci­a­tion ­between mus­cle ­strength and BMD in gym­nasts.
Conclusion. These ­results sug­gest ­that the asso­ci­a­tion ­between mus­cle ­strength and BMD in ­young wom­en is depen­dent on exer­cise stat­us. The oste­o­gen­ic ­effect of ­increased mechan­i­cal load­ing asso­ciat­ed ­with gym­nas­tics train­ing like­ly con­trib­utes to the dis­so­ci­a­tion of the rela­tion­ship in gym­nasts.

inizio pagina