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Original articles  SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 March;42(1):95-102

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Stages of exercise behavior and caloric expenditure

Austrin Klein D., Stone W. J.

From the Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA


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Background. This ­study ­assessed the abil­ity of the stag­es of exer­cise behav­ior to dif­fer­en­tiate calor­ic ener­gy expen­di­ture, by ­stage, ­based ­upon ­self-­report of ener­gy expen­di­ture (EE).
Methods. Volunteer ­male and ­female par­tic­i­pants (n=890) report­ed cur­rent ­stage of phys­i­cal activ­ity; phys­i­cal activ­ity ­mode, dura­tion, and fre­quen­cy; and dem­o­graph­ic infor­ma­tion (­height and ­weight). Data cal­cu­lat­ed ­from report­ed infor­ma­tion includ­ed EE, ­body ­mass ­index (BMI), and BMI cat­e­go­ry. EE pro­files ­were estab­lished by aver­age esti­mat­ed EE (kcal/wk), aver­age ­total ­time (min/wk) for phys­i­cal activ­ity, aver­age activ­ity fre­quen­cy (­times/wk), aver­age ses­sion dura­tion (min/ses­sion), mod­er­ate and vig­or­ous EE lev­els (­kcal/wk), and cat­e­go­rized activ­ity lev­el (sed­en­tary, mod­er­ate, vig­or­ous).
Results. There ­were no sig­nif­i­cant with­in gen­der dif­fer­enc­es ­across stag­es of exer­cise behav­ior for ­height. Terminators dif­fered sig­nif­i­cant­ly for ­weight ­from all oth­er ­groups, and BMI was sig­nif­i­cant­ly ­less ­across ­groups, by gen­der. All ­males ­were iden­ti­fied in the “Mildly Obese” BMI lev­el, ­while ­only ­females in the non-­active (pre­con­tem­pla­tion, con­tem­pla­tion, and prep­ar­a­tion) ­groups ­were so iden­ti­fied. All oth­er ­females ­were at the “Acceptable” BMI lev­el. Regardless of gen­der, all ­groups ­were sig­nif­i­cant­ly dif­fer­ent ­from the sed­en­tary pre­con­tem­pla­tion and con­tem­pla­tion ­group for EE. Male and ­female prep­ar­a­tion ­groups report­ed EE in the mod­er­ate lev­el, and ­were sig­nif­i­cant­ly dif­fer­ent ­from the ­action, main­te­nance, and ter­mi­na­tion ­groups, who report­ed EE in the vig­or­ous lev­el. Across sub­se­quent stag­es of exer­cise behav­ior, ­female par­tic­i­pants dem­on­strat­ed ­increased EE. Male par­tic­i­pants ­were sim­i­lar­ly pro­filed, ­with the excep­tion of one ­group (­action ­stage), ­which was con­sid­er­ably great­er ­than all oth­er ­groups.
Conclusions. This ­study con­firmed the ear­li­er exam­ined prem­ise, by Cardinal, ­that ­self-select­ed ­stage of exer­cise behav­ior dif­fer­en­tiates EE by ­stage.

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