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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 September;38(3):234-9

Copyright © 1999 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Lumbar bone mineral density in adolescent female runners

Moen S. M. 1, Sanborn C. F. 2, Dimarco N. M. 2, Gench B. 2, Bonnick S. L. 3, Keizer H. A. 4, Menheere P. P. C. A. 5

1 Dallas Baptist University, Dallas, USA; 2 Texas Woman’s University; 3 Aerobics Center, Dallas, Texas; 4 University of Limburg, The Netherlands; 5 Academic Hospital, The Netherlands


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Background. The pur­pose of ­this ­study was to deter­mine if ­there ­were sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­enc­es in lum­bar ­bone min­er­al den­sity (L2-L4, g/ cm2) or sev­er­al hor­mones ­among 3 ­groups of ado­les­cent ­females: 10 amen­or­rhe­ic run­ners, 10 eumen­or­rhe­ic run­ners, and 10 eumen­or­rhe­ic con­trols.
Methods. Experimental ­design: com­par­a­tive.
Setting. Cooper Clinic, Aerobics Center, Dallas, Texas.
Patients or par­tic­i­pants. The sub­jects ­were ­white, non-smok­ers, ­aged 15.1-18.8 ­years, who ­were not tak­ing ­birth con­trol ­pills. All amen­or­rhe­ic run­ners had ­less ­than 5 men­stru­al peri­od in the ­past ­year, aver­ag­ing 2,4 peri­ods. The run­ners aver­aged approx­i­mate­ly 36 ­miles/­week (58.1 km) dur­ing the ­last 9 ­months of ­their train­ing sea­son and had ­been run­ning for 1-5 ­years.
Interventions. ­None.
Measures. lum­bar ­bone min­er­al den­sity (BMD), 10 hor­mones, per­cent­age of ­body fat, and die­tary ­intake ­were meas­ured.
Results. Mean lum­bar BMD (g/cm2) did not dif­fer sig­nif­i­cant­ly ­among ­groups (amen­or­rhe­ic run­ners=1.134, eumen­or­rhe­ic run­ners=1.165, con­trols=1.148). However, expect­ed ­trends ­were ­observed. Compared to the con­trols, the amen­or­rhe­ic run­ners tend­ed to ­have low­er lum­bar BMD and the eumen­or­rhe­ic run­ners, high­er. Although ­there ­were sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­enc­es in con­cen­tra­tions of ­five ser­um hor­mones meas­ured, all ­mean hor­mo­nal val­ues ­were with­in nor­mal rang­es. Calcium ­intakes ­were low for all ­groups.
Conclusions. In ­this ­study, ­with its ­small num­ber of sub­jects and ­great var­i­abil­ity with­in ­each ­group, it was con­clud­ed ­that ­there is no sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ence ­among amen­or­rhe­ic run­ners, eumen­or­rhe­ic run­ners, and con­trols in lum­bar BMD. However, a long­er peri­od of ame­nor­rhea ­might ­result in sig­nif­i­cant­ly low­er BMD for the amen­or­rhe­ic run­ners.

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