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REVIEW  MOLECULAR PET IMAGING IN ADAPTIVE RADIOTHERAPY 

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2018 December;62(4):404-10

DOI: 10.23736/S1824-4785.18.03080-7

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

PET imaging in adaptive radiotherapy of prostate tumors

Bettina BEUTHIEN-BAUMANN 1 , Stefan A. KOERBER 2, 3

1 Division of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany; 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 3 National Center of Radiation Oncology (NCRO), Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg, Germany



The integration of data from positron-emission-tomography, combined with computed tomography as positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET/CT) or combined with magnet resonance imaging as PET/MRI, into radiation treatment planning of prostate cancer is gaining higher impact with the development of more sensitive and specific radioligands. The classic PET-tracer for prostate cancer imaging are [11C]choline and [11C]acetate, which are currently outperformed by ligands binding to the prostate-specific-membrane-antigen (PSMA). [68Ga]PSMA-11, which is the most frequently applied tracer, has shown to detect lymph node metastases, local recurrences, distant metastases and intraprostatic foci with high sensitivity, even at relatively low PSA levels. The results from PET-imaging may influence radiotherapeutic management at different stages of the disease i.e. during primary staging or biochemical recurrence, when the detection of distant metastases may alter the curative treatment concept into a palliative approach. On the other hand, the clinical target volume could be adapted by visualizing lymph node metastases at locations, which might not have been suspicious on morphologic imaging alone. The treatment plan might contain a boost to the dominant intraprostatic lesion, which could be delineated by a combination of PET-tracer uptake and multiparametric MRI. Therefore, PSMA-PET imaging is well suited for being integrated into prostate radiation planning. However, further prospective trials evaluating the impact on oncological outcome are indicated.


KEY WORDS: Prostatic neoplasms - Positron-emission tomography - Radiotherapy

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