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Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 2019 February;63(1):11-8

DOI: 10.23736/S0390-5616.16.03847-9

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Allograft versus autograft in cervical and lumbar spinal fusions: an examination of operative time, length of stay, surgical site infection, and blood transfusions

Meghan E. MURPHY 1, 2, Brandon A. MCCUTCHEON 1, 2, Jennifer GRAUBERGER 1, 2, Daniel SHEPHERD 1, 2, Patrick R. MALONEY 1, 2, Lorenzo RINALDO 1, 2, Panagiotis KEREZOUDIS 1, 2, Jeremy L. FOGELSON 1, Ahmad NASSR 3, Mohamad BYDON 1, 2

1 Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2 Mayo Clinic Neuro-Informatics Laboratory, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA


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BACKGROUND: Autograft harvesting for spine arthrodesis has been associated with longer operative times and increased blood loss. Allograft compared to autograft in spinal fusions has not been studied in a multicenter cohort.
METHODS: Patients enrolled in the ACS-NSQIP registry between 2012 and 2013 who underwent cervical or lumbar spinal fusion with either allograft or autograft through a separate incision were included for analysis. The primary outcomes of interest were operative time, length of stay, blood transfusion, and surgical site infection (SSI).
RESULTS: A total of 6790 and 6718 patients received a cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, respectively. On unadjusted analysis in both cervical and lumbar cohorts, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion (cervical: 2.9% vs. 1.0%, P<0.001; and lumbar: 21.0% vs. 15.7%, P<0.001) and increased operative time (cervical: 167 vs. 128 minutes, P<0.001; and lumbar: 226 vs. 204 minutes, P<0.001) relative to allograft. On multivariable analysis in both the cervical and lumbar cohorts, autograft was associated with increased odds of blood transfusion (cervical: OR=2.3, 95% CI: 1.0-5.1; and lumbar: OR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.6) and longer operative times (cervical: 27.8 minutes, 95% CI: 20.7-35.0; and lumbar: 25.4 minutes, 95% CI: 17.7-33.1) relative to allograft. Autograft was not associated with either length of stay or SSI.
CONCLUSIONS: In a multicenter cohort of patients undergoing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion and increased operative time relative to allograft.


KEY WORDS: Spinal fusion - Lumbar vertebrae - Cervical vertebrae - Allografts - Autografts

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