Home > Riviste > Minerva Obstetrics and Gynecology > Fascicoli precedenti > Articles online first > Minerva Obstetrics and Gynecology 2022 Jul 13

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

Opzioni di pubblicazione
eTOC
Per abbonarsi
Sottometti un articolo
Segnala alla tua biblioteca
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Estratti
Permessi
Per citare questo articolo
Share

 

Original Article   

Minerva Obstetrics and Gynecology 2022 Jul 13

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-606X.22.05145-4

Copyright © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Prelabour rupture of the membranes at term: antibiotic overuse in Italy

Filomena G. SILEO 1, 2, Anna L. TRAMONTANO 3, Alessandra SPONZILLI 3, Fabio FACCHINETTI 3

1 Prenatal Medicine Unit, Unit of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences for Mother, Child and Adult, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy; 2 Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, International Doctorate School in Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy; 3 Unit of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences for Mother, Child and Adult, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy



BACKGROUND: The proper management of women with premature rupture of membrane (PROM) and not spontaneously entering in labour remains controversial. The aim of this study was to identify the current management for women with PROM at term according to the Group B Streptococcus (GBS) status across different Italian hospitals.
METHODS: Anonymous online survey evaluating: the current practice of women with PROM in terms of management (expectant management vs. induction of labour) and antibiotic prophylaxis according to GBS status.
RESULTS: In case of negative GBS status, the 82.4% of respondents wait until 24 hours before labour induction. Antibiotics are administered for prophylaxis in 35.3%, 27.5% and 2% at 18, 12 and 24 hours respectively. The remaining 35.3% of respondents are divided between those using antibiotics only with signs of infections or according to different risk factors (i.e. meconium-stained amniotic fluid or suspected infection). Neonates born from a mother with negative GBS status almost never (90.2%) receive prophylactic antibiotics. In case of positive GBS status, induction is started as soon as possible by 49.1% of respondents; the remnants choose to wait 6 (15.7%), 12 (17.6%), 18 (3.9%) and 24 (13.7%) hours. Antibiotics are administered as soon as possible by 78.4% of clinicians. In the neonates, 51% of neonatologist administer antibiotics upon clinical indications (suspected sepsis); 15.7% use antibiotics routinely or with a short interval between maternal antibiotics and delivery (17.6%).
CONCLUSIONS: The management after PROM is highly heterogeneous with an inappropriate extension of antibiotic prophylaxis in cases with negative GBS status.


KEY WORDS: Antibiotics; Antibiotic prophylaxis; Group B Streptococcus; Induction of labour; PROM

inizio pagina