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ORIGINAL ARTICLE   

Minerva Ginecologica 2019 August;71(4):288-97

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4784.19.04294-1

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices of obstetrics-gynecologists on seasonal influenza and pertussis immunizations in pregnant women: preliminary results from North-Western Italy

Matteo RICCO' 1 , Luigi VEZZOSI 2, Giovanni GUALERZI 3, Federica BALZARINI 4, Vito A. CAPOZZI 5, Lavinia VOLPI 6

1 Department of Public Health, Service for Health and Safety in the Workplace, IRCCS-AUSL di Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy; 2 Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy; 3 Department of Medicine and Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Parma, Parma, Italy; 4 San Raffaele Hospital, University “Vita e Salute”, Milan, Italy; 5 Unit of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, Parma, Italy; 6 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IRCCS-AUSL di Reggio Emilia, Guastalla Civil Hospital, Guastalla, Reggio Emilia, Italy



BACKGROUND: Italian National Immunization Plan (NIP) 2017-2019 has introduced new recommendations regarding immunization practices during pregnancy. In this cross-sectional study, we documented specific knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) in a sample of obstetrician-gynecologists (OBGYN).
METHODS: A total of 68 OBGYN (39.7% of males, mean age of 47.7±9.3 years old) compiled a structured online questionnaire. Participants were asked about: knowledge of vaccine issues (both in general and regarding NIP recommendations for pregnant women); actual performance/recommendation of seasonal influenza (SID) and tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccinations (Tdap); risk perception about SID and pertussis. Eventually, a regression analysis was performed in order to identify predictive factors for vaccine propensity.
RESULTS: Although most OBGYN were aware of official recommendations, only 57.4% and 55.9% correctly recalled the appropriate timing for vaccinations shots for SID and Tdap. Overall, 79.4% and 67.6% of participants usually delivered or recommended SID and Tdap to pregnant women, respectively. Main perceived barriers were identified by OBGYN in patients’ fear of side effects (89.7%), their low risk perception (82.3%), insufficient awareness of official recommendations among pregnant women (75.0%). Significant predictors of Tdap practice were identified in higher risk perception (OR 6.466, 95% CI: 1.077; 38.803) and better knowledge of official recommendations (OR 7.310, 95% CI: 1.195; 44.704), whereas SID was apparently unrelated with individual characteristics of participants.
CONCLUSIONS: Sampled OBGYN were largely favorable towards vaccination of pregnant women. As knowledge of official recommendations was identified as a main predictor of appropriate behavior at least for Tdap practice, future educational interventions could eventually improve immunization rates.


KEY WORDS: Immunization; Pregnancy; Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine; Influenza, human; Pregnancy complications; Obstetrics

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