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Minerva Endocrinology 2021 Sep 21

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-6507.21.03397-2

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Association of overweight and obesity with vertebral fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Yan AN, Jia-Ning LI, Yang WANG , Wei TIAN, Nan LI

Department of Spine Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital & Peking University Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Beijing, China



BACKGROUND: Over the past decade, there has been increasing interest in exploring the relationship between overweight, obesity and vertebral fractures. Nonetheless, available data from studies on the relationship between overweight, obesity and vertebral fractures remains controversial.
METHODS: A systematic search was performed in the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases. We selected relevant literature by using these keywords: fracture, vertebral fracture, vertebral compression fracture, overweight, obese, obesity. The retrieval mainly collected publicly published observational studies on the correlation between overweight, obesity and vertebral fractures, excluding the literature that did not meet the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis for the data extracted from all the included literatures was performed by STATA 12.0 to summarize test performance with forest plots and assess the heterogeneity.
RESULTS: Ten studies, including 1,024,181 subjects satisfied the predefined eligibility criteria. The results showed that the overweight (25.0≤ body mass index (BMI) ≤29.9 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI ≥30.0kg/m2) were associated with a decreased risk of vertebral fractures, respectively. The pooled RR is 0.86 [95% CI: 0.79, 0.95] and 0.81[95% CI:0.74-0.90] with no evidence of statistical heterogeneity. However, the relationship between overweight/obesity (BMI ≥25 kg/m2) and vertebral fractures is not statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that overweight and obesity might decrease the risk of vertebral fractures, respectively. However, we did not observe a significant association between overweight/obesity (BMI≥25 kg/m2) and vertebral fractures.


KEY WORDS: Vertebral fracture; Overweight; Obesity

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