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Minerva Biotecnologica 2005 March;17(1):33-45

Copyright © 2005 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Milestones in wine biotechnology

Ramón D. 1, 2, 3, Genovés S. 3, Gil J. V. 2, Herrero O. 2, MacCabe A. 2, Manzanares P. 2, Matallana E. 4, Orejas M. 2, Uber G. 2, 4, Vallés S. 2

1 Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health Bromatology, Toxicology and Legal Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; 2 Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and technology of the Food, CSIC, Valencia, Spain; 3 Research and Development Department, Biópolis S. L., Valencia, Spain; 4 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain


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Wine production is a classic example of biotechnology in which 2 organisms, yeast and grape, contribute to the production of an alcoholic beverage. Whilst genetic engineering techniques have been applied to both of these organisms in recent years, much greater progress has been made in modifying yeast. By virtue of the development of GRAS (generally recognised as safe) transformation techniques, transgenic yeast strains have been constructed that improve the physico-chemical, organoleptical or nutritional properties of the wines they produce. However, the commercialisation and labelling of these transgenic wines is subject to complex legislation in the European Union. Their sale, particularly in Europe, will require transparency of information for the consumer in relation to their safety evaluation and product labelling.

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