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Minerva Anestesiologica 2018 September;84(9):1102-7

DOI: 10.23736/S0375-9393.18.12628-9

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Controversies in office-based anesthesia: obstructive sleep apnea considerations

Ruchir GUPTA 1 , Srinivas PYATI 2

1 Department of Anesthesiology, University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA; 2 Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA



As the number of procedures being performed in the office-based anesthesia (OBA) setting are increasing, so are the number of patients presenting for surgery with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). There continues to be controversy regarding whether these patients can be safely cared for in the OBA setting. To date, no national guideline has clearly addressed this issue and while some have extrapolated lessons from what has been published for OSA in the ambulatory surgery center (ASC) setting, some argue that there is a significant difference in the availability of resources in the ASC versus the OBA setting. Those opposing OSA patients for OBA setting point to the prevalence of “practice drift,” and no federal oversight as overarching reasons why the OBA is not an appropriate setting. Proponents of the OBA setting argue that a well-equipped OBA can have similar resources, and therefore similar outcomes, as an OR in the ASC setting. In this paper we explore the divergent views on this topic and present some recommendations based on best evidence.


KEY WORDS: Sleep apnea, obstructive - Anesthesia - Airway management

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