Home > Riviste > European Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery > Fascicoli precedenti > European Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2020 April;4(1) > European Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2020 April;4(1):8-10

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
Per abbonarsi
Sottometti un articolo
Segnala alla tua biblioteca
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Estratti
Permessi
Per citare questo articolo

 

CASE REPORT   

European Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2020 April;4(1):8-10

DOI: 10.23736/S2532-3466.19.00192-9

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Surgical reposition of the trochlea in a case of acquired Brown’s Syndrome

Tommaso RIZZO 1 , Paolo CECCHINI 2, Rossella D’ALOISIO 2, Michele MAGLIONE 1, Roberto RIZZO 1

1 Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, Maxillo-Facial, Dentistry and Stomatology Clinic, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy; 2 Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, Ophtalmology Clinic, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy



An orbital or frontal trauma dislocating the trochlea determines a strabismus by an acquired Brown’s syndrome (BS). The maxillofacial surgeon and ophthalmologist combined management is needed before, during and after the surgical treatment. A 28-year-old man with cranial maxillofacial trauma involving the left frontal bone and the roof of the left orbit was hospitalized. Clinical ophthalmological and radiological examinations were performed. computerized tomography scan showed medial and caudal dislocation of the left orbital roof together with the left orbital trochlear complex. At the ophthalmological evaluation 4-prism diopters hypotropia of the left eye and reduced convergence were detected. The patient underwent surgical treatment for frontal bone fracture reposition. A pre and postoperative Hess chart was obtained to evaluate the surgical results. Two weeks after surgery the ophthalmological examination showed no diplopia, no muscular impairing, a good eye convergence and no head malposition. Prismatic lens correction was not necessary. Surgical reposition of the frontal bone fracture involving the superomedial orbital bone and the trochlea allowed to successfully solve the acquired diplopia by the BS. The role of the ophthalmologist is a key factor throughout the whole management of the craniomaxillofacial surgical treatment.


KEY WORDS: Ocular motility disorders; Trochlear nerve injuries; Surgical procedures, operative; Diplopia

inizio pagina