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Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2021 March;180(3):59-64

DOI: 10.23736/S0393-3660.19.04178-0

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Comparison of aerobic profiles between the field-based 20 m-shuttle run test and the laboratory-based bike ergometer test in runners

Kenji TAKAO 1 , Hiromasa UENO 1, Kanta HAMAGUCHI 2, Tadao ISAKA 1

1 Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Japan; 2 Graduate School of Human Environment, Osaka Sangyo University, Daito, Japan



BACKGROUND: In this study, we compared maximal heart rate and maximal oxygen consumption between the 20-m shuttle run test and the bike ergometer test among 30 recreational runners.
METHODS: The 5000-m time trial was used to quantify the reference maximal heart rate during running and running performance.
RESULTS: Maximal heart rate was significantly higher using the 20-m shuttle run test and 5000-m time trial than using the bike ergometer test (P<0.001 for both). Although the maximal heart rate measured using both the 20-m shuttle run test and bike ergometer test correlated to the value measured during 5000-m time trial (r=0.870, P<0.001 for the 20-m shuttle run test; r=0.650, P<0.001 for the bike ergometer test), the coefficient of correlation to the 5000-m time trial was higher for the 20-m shuttle run test than for the bike ergometer test (P=0.040). The maximal oxygen consumption was significantly higher during the 20-m shuttle run test than during the bike ergometer test (P<0.001), with both values correlating to the time of 5000-m time trial (r=-0.902, P<0.001 for the 20-m shuttle run test; r=-0.853, P<0.001 for the bike ergometer test).
CONCLUSIONS: Based on our findings, the maximal heart rate measured using the 20-m shuttle run test would be more suitable to evaluate the aerobic capacity of runners than that measured using the bike ergometer test.


KEY WORDS: Open field test; Athletic performance; Heart rate; Exercise; Resistance training

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