Home > Riviste > Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche > Fascicoli precedenti > Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2020 July-August;179(7-8) > Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2020 July-August;179(7-8):452-8

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
Per abbonarsi PROMO
Sottometti un articolo
Segnala alla tua biblioteca
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Estratti
Permessi
Per citare questo articolo
Share

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE   

Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2020 July-August;179(7-8):452-8

DOI: 10.23736/S0393-3660.19.04140-8

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Differences in psychophysiological parameters of lifeguards performing water surface and 5.5 m deep underwater rescues

Dimitrios LOUPOS

Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece



BACKGROUND: Although all the existing studies in relevant bibliography focus on rescues on the surface of the water, there is none concerning underwater/submerged victim rescues. The aim of this research was to determine probable psychophysiological differences between a surface and an underwater at 5.5m below the surface, rescue.
METHODS: Nineteen male lifeguards, with a 1 to 2 year experience, age 19.7±1.1, (weight 71.5±4.5 kg, height 1.77±4 cm) took part in the study. The lifeguards, in random order, performed two different rescues: a surface and an underwater one. Before every rescue multidimensional state anxiety was assessed using the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2) Martens et al. After the rescue, a blood sample was taken for the determination of lactic acid concentration and a perceptual effort ratings scale (Borg 1982) was filled out by the lifeguards.
RESULTS: The results indicated statistically significant differences. The second 50 m (1.35.5 vs. 1.47.2 min) the total rescue time (2.20.0 vs. 2.41.7min), the cognitive (14.5 vs. 17.1) and somatic anxiety (12.8 vs. 15.1), the perceptual effort (14.4 vs. 16.3) and the lactic acid (7.8 vs. 9 mmol/L) of the underwater rescue, were larger than the ones of the surface rescue.
CONCLUSIONS: Underwater rescues require better mental and physical preparedness a fact that makes specific underwater training techniques as necessary as lifeguard and fitness training.


KEY WORDS: Physical exertion; Lactic acid; Swimming

inizio pagina