Home > Riviste > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine > Fascicoli precedenti > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2020 October;56(5) > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2020 October;56(5):585-93

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
Per abbonarsi PROMO
Sottometti un articolo
Segnala alla tua biblioteca
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Estratti
Permessi
Per citare questo articolo

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE   Freefree

European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2020 October;56(5):585-93

DOI: 10.23736/S1973-9087.20.05975-4

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

How effective and efficient are different exercise patterns in reducing back pain?

Gerhard MÜLLER , Lisa LYSSENKO, Marco GIURGIU, Manuela PFINDER, Michael CLEMENT, Andreas KAISERAUER, Monika HEINZEL-GUTENBRUNNER, Thomas KOHLMANN, Klaus BÖS



BACKGROUND: Exercise is considered an effective intervention to relieve chronic back pain. However, it is still unknown whether specific exercise patterns vary in terms of their efficiency and effectiveness.
AIM: To investigate the differential health and economic effects of intensity, specificity and degree of subjective perceived physical exertion across five exercise patterns (endurance, gymnastics, fitness, back gymnastics, multimodal back exercise) in adults with back pain.
DESIGN: Longitudinal observational cohort study over a period of 24 months.
SETTING: Various non-therapeutic exercise facilities (e.g. outdoor, fitness centers, health insurance programs, sports clubs) across one federal state of Germany (Baden-Wuerttemberg).
POPULATION: Adults with back pain (N.=2,542, Mean =46.9 years, 66% females, graded chronic back pain [GCPS] 1=40.5%, GCPS 2=27.3%, GCPS 3=20.7%, GCPS 4=11.5%).
METHODS: Self-reported back pain (functional restrictions and pain = back pain function score, [BPFS]) and characteristics of exercising behavior (frequency, duration, type, physical exertion) were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Direct medical costs for back disorders (international classification of diseases, dorsopathies: M40-M54) were compiled from health insurance records.
RESULTS: Moderate- to high-intensity exercise patterns were effective in reducing back pain, particularly at lower levels of subjective perceived physical exertion. At these intensity levels, multimodal back exercise (i.e. exercising the spine-stabilizing muscles specifically, ergonomic training) was 14.5 times more effective than non-back specific fitness exercise in reducing BPFS. The beneficial effects of both exercise types increased with the initial severity of back pain. However, only multimodal back exercise (moderate- to high-intensity/high back specificity) was associated with a significant decrease in direct medical costs for back pain.
CONCLUSIONS: Targeted exercise of the spine-stabilizing musculature at moderate to high intensities without maximum perceived exertion is effective and efficient in reducing back pain.
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: The combination of high-intensity and high-specificity exercises yielded a significant reduction in medical costs. However, the intensities in terms of muscular load in endurance training and gymnastics may not be sufficient to reduce back pain effectively.


KEY WORDS: Exercise; Physical exertion; Back pain; Cohort studies

inizio pagina