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  REHABILITATION ISSUES IN CHILDREN WITH NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES Freefree

European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2010 December;46(4):581-98

Copyright © 2011 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Physical medicine respiratory muscle aids to avert respiratory complications of pediatric chest wall and vertebral deformity and muscle dysfunction

Ishikawa Y. 1, Bach J. R. 2, 3, 4

1 Department of Pediatrics, National Hospital Organization Yakumo Hospital, Yakumo, Japan; 2 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; 3 Department of Neurosciences, UMDNJNew Jersey Medical School; 4 Center for Ventilator Management Alternatives University Hospital, Newark, NJ, USA


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The purpose of this article was to describe the use of noninvasive inspiratory and expiratory muscle aids to prevent chest wall deformities including pectus excavatum, to prevent respiratory complications of vertebral surgery, to prevent acute and long-term ventilatory insufficiency and failure in children with paralytic disorders who develop these deformities, and to permit the extubation and tracheostomy tube decanulation of “unweanable” patients. Noninvasive airway pressure aids can provide up to continuous ventilator support for patients with little or no vital capacity and can provide for effective cough flows for patients with severely dysfunctional expiratory muscles. An April 2010 consensus of clinicians from 20 centers in 14 countries reported over 1 500 spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients who survived using continuous ventilatory support without tracheostomy tubes. Four of the centers routinely extubated unweanable DMD patients so that none of their over 250 such patients has undergone tracheotomy.

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