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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  FRONTIERS IN AORTIC ARCH SURGERY - PART 2 

The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2022 August;63(4):415-24

DOI: 10.23736/S0021-9509.22.12388-8

Copyright © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Open arch surgery in the redo setting: contemporary outcomes

Andrew M. VEKSTEIN , G. Chad HUGHES, Edward P. CHEN

Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA



BACKGROUND: Aortic arch reconstruction after prior cardiac surgery is technically complex, especially after proximal aortic surgery. While multiple surgical adaptations in the redo setting have been described, traditional open reconstruction remains the most common approach with significant variability in outcomes in prior reports. This study describes institutional adaptations to surgical technique and perioperative care and assesses operative and long-term outcomes after redo-aortic arch repair in the modern era.
METHODS: Patients undergoing hemi- or total arch reconstruction after prior cardiac surgery (2005-2022) were identified from a prospectively maintained institutional database. Strategic adaptations in approach over the study interval included a shift towards Type II hybrid arch repair for patients with “mega-aorta,” redo-cannulation of the axillary artery when necessary, and adoption of transfusion and early extubation protocols. Outcomes of interest included 30-day/in-hospital adverse events and actuarial long-term overall and aorta-specific survival.
RESULTS: The study cohort included 214 patients undergoing hemi-arch (N.=154, 72%) or total arch (N.=60, 28%) after prior cardiac surgery (50% prior proximal aortic surgery). Surgical indications included degenerative aneurysm (47%, N.=101), residual arch dissection after prior type A repair (29%, N.=61), acute or chronic type A dissection (18%, N.=39) or other (6%, N.=13). 30-day/in-hospital mortality was 6% (5% hemi-arch; 10% total arch) and stroke was 3% (3% hemi-arch; 2% total arch). At median follow-up of 56 months, overall 5- and 10-year survival was 76% and 58% (hemi-arch: 81%, 62%; total arch: 63%, 43%); aorta-specific survival was 91% and 90% (hemi-arch: 96%, 94%; total arch: 79%, 79%).
CONCLUSIONS: In this modern single-institution series, a systematic approach to redo-arch repair yields excellent operative outcomes and late aorta-specific survival. Reduced late overall survival reflects the comorbidity burden of this population. Open reconstruction continues to play an important role in reoperative arch repair in the modern era.


KEY WORDS: Aorta, thoracic; Reoperation, Circulatory arrest, deep hypothermia induced

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