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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  VASCULAR SECTION 

The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2020 February;61(1):78-83

DOI: 10.23736/S0021-9509.18.10595-7

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

A new option using adjunctive microsheath angiography to increase the safety during percutaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

Koji MAEDA , Takao OHKI, Yuji KANAOKA, Takeshi BABA, Kota SHUKUZAWA, Reo TAKIZAWA, Makiko OMORI

Department of Vascular Surgery, Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan



BACKGROUND: Percutaneous endovascular aortic repair (PEVAR) is widespread for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The purpose of this study was to present outcomes of PEVAR using simultaneous angiography via microsheath.
METHODS: There were 100 punctures in 50 patients undergoing PEVAR for AAA. All cases used the ProGlide closure device (Abbot Vascular, Santa Clara, CA, USA) for PEVAR, and another puncture with microsheath placed on the common femoral artery for a second insertion point of the ProGlide. Basically, a single ProGlide was used for each puncture in the PEVAR. Hemostasis, stenosis, dissection, and distal embolization were confirmed in angiography via the adjunctive microsheath after removal of the delivery system. Since the PEVAR for AAA requires at least two punctures, this procedure was applied to both sites. Primary outcome was technical success and occurrence rates of access-related complications in PEVAR. Technical success was defined as complete hemostasis without surgical intervention and the need for conversion to general anesthesia.
RESULTS: Technical success was achieved in 98% (98/100) of the cases. Access-related complications on perioperative periods were identified in two cases. One case involved a tip of the microsheath being transected by the ProGlide that led to a distal embolization, which is why a cut down was required to retrieve the tip of the sheath. Another case required a cut down due to persistent hemorrhage from the puncture site of the microsheath. Although persistent hemorrhage was identified in five punctures (5.0%) via the adjunctive microsheath angiography, additional manual compression or ProGlide achieved complete hemostasis. Both stenosis and dissection following PEVAR were not identified in any case.
CONCLUSIONS: A supporting angiography via microsheath in confirming the absence of hemorrhage, stenosis, dissection, and distal embolization may be worthwhile to selectively use for cases of PEVAR.


KEY WORDS: Endovascular procedures; Aortic aneurysm, abdominal; Angiography

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