Home > Riviste > Acta Phlebologica > Fascicoli precedenti > Acta Phlebologica 2022 August;23(2) > Acta Phlebologica 2022 August;23(2):43-51

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

Opzioni di pubblicazione
eTOC
Per abbonarsi
Sottometti un articolo
Segnala alla tua biblioteca
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Estratti
Permessi
Per citare questo articolo
Share

 

REVIEW   

Acta Phlebologica 2022 August;23(2):43-51

DOI: 10.23736/S1593-232X.22.00516-1

Copyright © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

External musculoskeletal compression of the internal jugular vein: a systematic review

Burak B. OZKARA , Mert KARABACAK, Ahmet A. AYGUN

Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey



INTRODUCTION: Internal jugular vein stenosis caused by external compression causes a variety of symptoms, which can lead to under-recognition of this entity. The purpose of this systematic review is to describe the various underlying causes of external compression of the internal jugular vein, as well as diagnosis, management, outcome, and accompanying pathologies. To the best to our knowledge, this is the first systematic review that inspects all the extrinsic musculoskeletal compressors of the internal jugular vein.
EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: This systematic review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. A systematic search of PubMed was conducted from its inception to 1 June 2021.
EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: A total of 119 patients, 66 males and 53 females, from 22 studies were included in this review. We divided the etiology into three categories: styloidogenic jugular venous compression (95%), compression caused by osseous structures other than the styloid process and the C1 transverse process (2%), and entrapment by muscular structures (3%). The most common symptoms were headache (52%), tinnitus (48%), and insomnia (46%). Improvement in symptoms after surgery alone or in conjunction with endovascular treatment was seen in 28 of the 31 patients (90%).
CONCLUSIONS: The internal jugular vein compression by musculoskeletal structures is not uncommon. In the “styloidogenic jugular venous compression” group, compression is caused not just by an elongated styloid process, but also by a narrowed distance between the C1 transverse process and the styloid process, as well as anatomical C1 variations. Because compression can only occur in specific positions in some cases, dynamic imaging, which involves creating these positions during imaging, is critical. Many patients benefit from interventional procedures.


KEY WORDS: Jugular veins; Eagle syndrome; Intracranial hypertension; Pseudotumor cerebri

inizio pagina