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REVIEW  UPDATE ON TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH AND DIAGNOSTIC-THERAPEUTIC PATHWAYS IN AUDIOLOGY 

Otorhinolaryngology 2021 September;71(3):181-95

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-6302.21.02391-4

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Prevention of noise damage and therapies for the regeneration of hair cells

Rolando ROLESI 1, 2, Fabiola PACIELLO 1, 3, Gaetano PALUDETTI 1, 2, Anna R. FETONI 1, 2

1 IRCCS A. Gemelli University Polyclinic Foundation, Rome, Italy; 2 Institute of Otolaryngology, Sacred Heart Catholic University, Rome, Italy; 3 Department of Neuroscience, Sacred Heart Catholic University, Rome, Italy



Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) due to occupational or recreational noise exposure is a major cause of acquired hearing loss. In Europe it is the most common occupational disease, accounting for about one third of all work-related diseases, ahead of skin and respiratory problems. It is well established that NIHL is characterized by multi-target cochlear damage, which could differently affect all main cochlear substructures according to temporal and energetic exposure characteristics. Currently, many strategies to protect or regenerate NIHL cochlear damage are the subject of intensive research. However, despite in the last two decades researchers have made significant advancements in understanding pathophysiology of noise induced hearing loss, currently there are no pharmacological or biological interventions approved by the USA Food and Drug Administration or European Medicines Agency for the purpose of protecting from NIHL. In this review, the authors outline the pathology and pathophysiology of hearing loss and present the results from many promising molecular and biological studies that have provided the basis for future therapeutic strategies.


KEY WORDS: Noise-induced hearing loss; Oxidative stress; Antioxidants; Auditory hair cells; Regenerative medicine; Mesenchymal stem cells

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