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Italian Journal of Dermatology and Venereology 2021 February;156(1):20-8

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

History of the Santa Maria and San Gallicano Dermatological Hospital

Francesca CURZI 1, Arianna AIELLO 2, Aldo MORRONE 2

1 Library, IRCCS San Gallicano Dermatological Institute, IFO, Rome, Italy; 2 Scientific Direction, IRCCS San Gallicano Dermatological Institute, IFO, Rome, Italy


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The Santa Maria and San Gallicano Hospital represents one of the first dermatological centers founded in the world; since its establishment its aim is to treat widespread skin diseases such as leprosy, scabies, ringworm, prurigo and mange. Its construction began on March 14, 1725 with a ceremony held for the laying of the foundation stone. Its official inauguration, however, is dated October 6, 1726 when Pope Benedict XIII issued the Bonus ille Seal. The hospital’s origins stem from the apostolic and charitable work by Father Emilio Lami, who was its first prior, and by the tenacious will of Cardinal Pietro Marcellino Corradini who was its protector. As can be seen by the marble plaque, still preserved and dated 1725, the health facility was intended for people with skin diseases. Venereal affections, such as syphilis and gonorrhea, were instead treated starting from the second half of the 19th century under the direction of Dr. Pietro Shilling and subsequently Dr. Gaetano Ciarrocchi. Since the 18th century, the hospital, built initially by architect Filippo Raguzzini, underwent expansion work including the construction of the “Nuova Corsia dei ragazzi tignoselli” ward, the “Anatomical Theater” of great artistic value and of the “Celtic Rooms.” More recently, from the 1939, the hospital obtained, and still maintains today, the recognition as an Institute for Hospitalization and Care of a Scientific Nature (IRCCS); a clear indication of its authoritativeness and value during almost three centuries of history.


KEY WORDS: Rome; History of medicine; Skin diseases; Sexually transmitted diseases; Hospital design and construction

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