Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > Articles online first > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2022 Aug 01

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

Publishing options
eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

Original Article   

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2022 Aug 01

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.22.14079-X

Copyright © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Does resistance exercise lifting velocity change with different rest intervals?

Yukina MOCHIZUKI, Mika SAITO, Hiroki HOMMA, Takamichi INOGUCHI, Takuto NAITO, Mikako SAKAMAKI-SUNAGA, Naoki KIKUCHI

Graduate School of Health and Sport Science, Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, Japan


PDF


BACKGROUND: In this study, we examined the Sex difference of the effect of rest intervals on lifting velocity during resistance exercise.
METHODS: Twenty-two trained subjects (11 men and 11 women) were included. Each protocol consisted of 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 70% of 1- repetition maximum (1RM) with rest intervals of 90 s (R90), 150 s (R150), and 240 s (R240) in a crossover design. The exercise did parallel squats with free weights. The measurement items are lifting velocity (mean velocity) in each repetition and blood lactate concentration after exercise.
RESULTS: There was a significant interaction between changes in the average velocity of 10 repetition in each set (AV10rep) and sex in each protocol, indicating that AV10rep during squat exercise has decreased in men but not in women in each protocol (p=0.002-0.03).
CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggested that short rest intervals will not recover lifting velocity between short rest intervals until the next set at men, while women will be able to recover even with short rest intervals.


KEY WORDS: Resistance exercise; Sex difference; Velocity loss; Strength

top of page