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Original Article   

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2022 Apr 12

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.22.13714-X

Copyright © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Adding protein to a carbohydrate pre-exercise beverage does not influence running performance and metabolism

Ana M. LOPES 1, 2 , Manoel RIOS 3, 4, Jorge BELEZA 1, 2, Diogo D. CARVALHO 3, 4, Sofia MONTEIRO 3, 4, Tiago MONTANHA 1, Sandra MARTINS 5, 6, João TIAGO GUIMARÃES 5, Ricardo J. FERNANDES 3, 4, José MAGALHÃES 1, 2, Vitor H. TEIXEIRA 1, 7, António ASCENSÃO 1, 2

1 Laboratory for Integrative and Translational Research in Population Health (ITR), Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure (CIAFEL), Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 2 Laboratory of Metabolism and Exercise (LaMetEx), Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 3 Centre of Research, Education, Innovation and Intervention in Sport (CIFI2D), Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 4 Porto Biomechanics Laboratory (LABIOMEP), University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 5 Clinical Pathology Department, São João Hospital Centre and Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 6 EPIUnit - Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 7 Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal


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BACKGROUND: To analyse whether pre-exercise CHO + PRO vs. CHO intake distinctly influences running performance and metabolic biomarkers along a various of exercise intensities.
METHODS: In a randomised, double blind, counterbalanced, crossover and placebo control design, 10 middle distance runners were tested in 3 occasions. After 10 h of fasting, participants ingested isovolumic beverages (0.75 + 0.25g·BW-1 of CHO + PRO, 1.0g·BW-1 of CHO and placebo control) 30 min before a treadmill running incremental protocol of 4 min steps until exhaustion. Venous blood was collected at fasting, 30 min after beverage ingestion and after the 3rd and 7th running steps. Oxygen uptake-related variables, including respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate, plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, free fatty acids, blood lactate concentrations, gastrointestinal discomfort and rate of perceived exertion were measured.
RESULTS: The addition of PRO to CHO had no influence on the measured variables, which did not differ between conditions along all incremental protocol intensities. The intake of CHO + PRO (compared to CHO) tended to decrease glycaemia (106.5 ± 21.3 vs. 113.6 ± 26.5) and to increase insulinaemia (14.4 ± 15.1 vs. 12.7 ± 10.8) at intensities close to maximum oxygen uptake.
CONCLUSIONS: The addition of PRO to a pre-exercise CHO beverage had no impact on running performance and related metabolic variables at a wide spectrum of exercise intensities.


KEY WORDS: Drinks; Metabolism; Nutrition; Runners

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