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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2021 Dec 21

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.21.12920-2

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The impact of a truncated competition on the sleep and wellness of sub-elite netballers

Samantha FIEN 1 , Madeline SPRAJCER 2, Charlotte C. GUPTA 2, Charli SARGENT 2, Nathan ELSWORTHY 1

1 School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Mackay, Queensland, Australia; 2 Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University - Adelaide Campus, Wayville, South Australia, Australia


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BACKGROUND: Sleep and wellness outcomes have been explored in elite netball athletes, but research examining these outcomes in sub-elite athletes is lacking despite high participation rates at the sub-elite level. The aim was to investigate the impact of the scheduling of games over consecutive days during a truncated four-round netball competition on the sleep and wellness outcomes of sub-elite netballers.
METHODS: A total of 12 female, sub-elite netball players were examined via sleep outcomes, stress, fatigue, mood, muscle soreness, and overall wellness on the night before, the night of, and for two nights after games during a four-round truncated competition. Linear mixed models examined changes for variables across days around game day.
RESULTS: Bedtime (p = 0.038), wake time (p = 0.001), fatigue (p = 0.003), and muscle soreness (p < 0.001) differed according to game status (i.e., pre-game days, game days, and post-game days). Bedtime was later on game days compared to pre-game days, and wake-up time was later on post-game days than pre-game days. Fatigue and muscle soreness were greater the day after the game, compared to days before the game. Over the four rounds, bedtime (p = 0.027) and wake-up time (p < 0.001) tended to be later, while wellness did not change.
CONCLUSIONS: These data may help guide coaching staff to plan training and travel arrangements during truncated multi-week competitions.


KEY WORDS: Fatigue; Exercise; Muscle soreness; Sleep

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