Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > Articles online first > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2021 Dec 16

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2021 Dec 16

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.21.12668-4

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Exercising at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic: acute physiological, perceptual and performance responses of wearing face masks during sports activity

Roberto MODENA 1 , Alessandro FORNASIERO 1, 2, Alexa CALLOVINI 1, 2, Aldo SAVOLDELLI 1, Barbara PELLEGRINI 1, 2, Federico SCHENA 1, 2, Lorenzo BORTOLAN 1, 2

1 CeRiSM, Sport Mountain and Health Research Center, University of Verona, Rovereto, Trento, Italy; 2 Department of Neuroscience, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy


PDF


BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic requires the adoption of strict preventive measures, such as wearing a protective face mask , but few studies investigated its impact during exercise. We investigated the effects of wearing a protective face mask while exercising at different intensities and verified whether differences between two types of protective face masks exist.
METHODS: Twenty subjects performed 4-min running at 8 km•h-1 and at 10 km•h-1, 8 x 90-m Intermittent running bouts and the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level-1, while wearing either a surgical mask, a sports-reusable mask or no mask. Physiological responses (HR, [La], SpO2), overall and breathlessness perceived exertion and YYIRT1-distance were assessed.
RESULTS: Breathlessness RPE was greater with surgical than without mask at the end of the run at 8 km•h-1 (+7.18 [3.21, 11.50]) and with both surgical and sports-reusable mask than without mask at the end of the run at 10 km•h-1 (+8.09 [4.09, 12.60] and +8.21 [4.53, 12.70]) and intermittent exercise (+11.10 [6.41, 16.10] and +10.50 [6.18, 15.30]). Overall RPE was greater with surgical than without mask at the end of the run at 8 (+3.71 [1.15, 6.91]) and 10 km•h-1 (+5.29 [2.26, 8.85]). Furthermore, YYIRT1 performance was lower with surgical (-150 m [44, 240]) and sports-reusable mask (-201 m [108, 286]) than without mask.
CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of exercise intensity and mask type, wearing a protective face mask mostly affects perceptual responses, also causing a performance reduction during maximal exercise. These findings must be considered when prescribing/practicing exercise while wearing a protective face mask.


KEY WORDS: Coronavirus; Sports; Respiratory protective devices; Physical functional performance; Perception

top of page