Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > Articles online first > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2021 Apr 19

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2021 Apr 19

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.21.12254-6

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Metabolic and cardiovascular effects of body weight supported treadmill walking in healthy older adults

Robert S. van ZANT 1 , Wick R. COLCHAGOFF 2, Anya M. COX 2, Benjamin R. EGGLESTON 2, Andrea D. GRIFFITH 2, Linda M. HARRISON 2, Amie S. NEWBERRY 2, Blake L. PRICE 2

1 Physical Therapy Department, Hanover College, Hanover, IN, USA; 2 Physical Therapy Department, University of Findlay Findlay, OH, USA


PDF


BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine if body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) decreased metabolic and cardiovascular demand in older (50-74 years) healthy adults while walking a self-selected speeds. The results of this study could impact clinician application to exercise therapy.
METHODS: Twenty subjects (50% female, 58.3+7.3 yr) completed 3, 5-minute treadmill walking trials at a self-selected pace, with 0%, 15%, and 30% body weight support (BWS). Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and oxygen uptake (VO2) were measured at rest, and during walking trials. Mean data from minutes 3-5 were analyzed for difference by repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni post-hoc testing.
RESULTS: At rest, HR was 70.8+8.2 bpm and BP was 126.8+12.2 / 84.3+8.6 mmHg. Mean walking speed was 67.1 m/min. Tested parameters during exercise trials were significantly (p<0.05) different from rest, but no significant differences were detected among the 3 exercise trials.
CONCLUSIONS: In older adults walking at self-selected speeds, up to 30% BWS had no significant impact on metabolic or cardiovascular demand.


KEY WORDS: Body weight supported gait; Cardiorespiratory response; Treadmill training

top of page