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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2021 Mar 17

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.21.12060-2

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene (ACE-I/D) differentiates the aerobic and speed performance of football players

Daniel B. COELHO 1, Eduardo M. PIMENTA 2, Izinara C. ROSSE 3, Emerson C. de OLIVEIRA 1 , Lenice K. BECKER 1, João B. FERREIRA-JÚNIOR 4, Lilian M. LOPES 5, Maria R. CARVALHO 6, Emerson SILAMI-GARCIA 2

1 Federal University of Ouro Preto, School of Physical Education, Health and Nutrition Postgraduate Program, Ouro Preto, Brazil; 2 Federal University of Minas Gerais, School of Physical Education, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 3 Federal University of Ouro Preto, School of Pharmacy, Ouro Preto, Brazil; 4 Federal Institute of Sudeste of Minas Gerais, Rio Pomba, Brazil; 5 Federal University of Ouro Preto, School of Nutrition, Health and Nutrition Postgraduate Program, Ouro Preto, Brazil; 6 Federal University of Minas Gerais, Institute of Biological Sciences, Belo Horizonte, Brazil


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BACKGROUND: The aim was to evaluate the distribution of ACE-I/D polymorphisms on Brazilian football players performance in aerobic capacity, strength, and speed tests.
METHODS: The participants in this study were 212 Brazilian first division male football players genotyped in DD, ID. or II. Genotyping of DNA from leucocytes was performed using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. We evaluated speed using a 30-m sprint test with speed measured at 10 m (V10), 20 m (V20), and 30 m (V30); muscular strength using counter-movement-jump and squat jump tests; and aerobic endurance using the Yo-Yo endurance test. The athletes were ranked in ascending order according to their performance in each test and divided into quartiles: first quartile (0-25%, Weak), second (25-50%, Normal), third (50-75%, Good), and fourth (75-100%, Excellent); these were clustered according to genotype frequency.
RESULTS: We identified significant differences in the V20 test values and in the aerobic capacity test. Higher frequencies of the ACE-DD genotype were observed in the Excellent performance group in the V20. In the aerobic capacity test, higher frequencies of the ACE-II genotype were observed in Excellent and Good performance groups.
CONCLUSIONS: Players with higher performance in anaerobic and aerobic tests are ACE-DD and ACE-II genotypes, respectively.


KEY WORDS: Football; ACE-I/D; Physical evaluation

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