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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2021 Mar 15

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.21.12306-0

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Comparing the effects of multicomponent exercise with or without power training on the cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, and muscular strength of patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial

Dongheon KANG 1, Jiyoung PARK 2, Irully JEONG 3, Seon-Deok EUN 2

1 Department of Healthcare and Public Health Research, Korea National Rehabilitation Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2 Department of Clinical Research for Rehabilitation, Korea National Rehabilitation Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3 Department of Sport Education, College of Physical Education, Kookmin University, Seoul, Republic of Korea


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BACKGROUND: Literature studies concerning the effect of implementing a multicomponent program with different individual exercise intensities are insufficient. This study aimed to examine the effects of performing a multicomponent exercise program incorporating high-speed power training on cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, and muscular strength in post-stroke patients. We compared the results of two different exercise regimens: high-speed power training and traditional low-speed strength training.
METHODS: Forty-five post-stroke patients were randomly assigned to the high-speed, low-speed, and control groups. A 60-min multicomponent exercise program was conducted three times per week for 8 weeks in the two exercise groups, whereas static stretching was performed in the control group. Cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, and muscular strength were assessed before and after the intervention.
RESULTS: Significant improvements were observed in the peak oxygen consumption values and results of the Berg balance scale, Korean version of the Trunk Impairment Scale, and Timed Up-and-Go test. The aforementioned were evaluated as a measure of cardiorespiratory function and functional ability in the exercise groups and compared to those obtained in the control group. High-speed power training led to greater improvement in patients compared with low-speed strength training.
CONCLUSIONS: Multicomponent exercise involving high-speed power training was beneficial in helping patients with stroke regain cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, and muscular strength.


KEY WORDS: Stroke; Exercise; Cardiorespiratory fitness; Physical functional performance; Muscle strength

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