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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2021 Feb 08

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.21.12093-6

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Does warming up with different music tempos affect physical and psychological responses? The evidence from a chronobiological study

Yosra BELKHIR 1, 2, 3, Ghazi REKIK 2, 4 , Hamdi CHTOUROU 5, 6, Nizar SOUISSI 1, 6

1 High Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Ksar-said, Manouba University, Tunis, Tunisia; 2 Research Laboratory, Education, Motricity, Sport and Health (LR19JS01), High Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Sfax, Sfax University, Sfax, Tunisia; 3 Al-Udhailiyah Primary School for Girls, Department of Physical Education, Al-Farwaniyah, Kuwait; 4 Tanyu Research Laboratory, Taipei, Taiwan; 5 High Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Sfax, Sfax University, Sfax, Tunisia; 6 Research Unit, Physical Activity, Sport and Health (UR18JS01), National Sport Observatory, Tunis, Tunisia


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BACKGROUND: This study examined the effects of listening to different music tempos during warm-up on short-term maximal performance and psychological responses, as a function of Times of Day (TOD).
METHODS: Fifteen well trained subjects (93.75% were semi-professional soccer players) randomly performed the 30-s Continuous Jump test (CJ30) during three morning sessions (07h00) and three evening sessions (17h00), separated by 48h of recovery, each after a warmup under three different conditions: without music (NO-M), with music at 60 bpm (LOW-M), and with music at 120-140 bpm (HIGH-M). The maximal jump height (Hmax), mean jump height of all jumps (Hmean), and fatigue index (FI %) were measured during CJ30. Feeling states (FS) were determined after warm-up, and body temperature was controlled before/after warm-up, as well as after CJ30.
RESULTS: Data analysis showed that Hmax, Hmean, and body temperature were higher at 17h00 than 07h00 in all experimental conditions. Moreover, Hmax, Hmean and FS were better after warm-ups with LOW-M and HIGH-M compared to NO-M condition at both TOD, with a higher gain at 07h00. More importantly, Hmax, Hmean and FS were better after warm-up with HIGH-M than with LOW-M at both TOD, with a higher gain at 07h00.
CONCLUSIONS: Although both music tempos were beneficial, warming-up with high music tempo (120-140 bpm) is better than warming-up with low music tempo (60 bpm) for improving short-term maximal performance and psychological responses whatever the TOD, especially in the morning hours.


KEY WORDS: Music; Warm-up; Anaerobic performance; Diurnal; Emotions.

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