Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > Articles online first > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2021 Feb 02

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2021 Feb 02

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.21.10894-1

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Validity of differentiated ratings of perceived exertion for use during AQUATIC cycling

Pierre FONTANARI 1 , Marcus PEIKRISZWILI TARTARUGA 2, Olivier CARON 1

1 LAMHESS - Laboratoire Motricité Humaine, Expertise, Sport, Santé, Université de Toulon, Toulon, France; 2 LABIER - Midwest State University of Paraná, Guarapuava, Brazil and UFPR - Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brazil


PDF


BACKGROUND: Although aquabiking has become widespread, the assessment of the intensity for aquatic cycling remains poorly defined.
METHODS: This study investigated the validity of differentiated ratings of perceived exertion (dRPE) recorded from the chest (RPE-Chest) and legs (RPE-Legs) during aquatic cycling and aimed to determine a simple and accurate estimate of dRPE to regulate aquabiking. Twelve active young subjects performed a pedaling task on an immersed ergocycle using randomly imposed cycling cadences ranging from 50 to 100 rpm in 5- minute steps interspersed by 3-minute active recovery periods. dRPE and cardiorespiratory responses (heart rate, HR; percentage of heart rate peak value, %HRpeak; oxygen uptake, V̇O2; and percentage of peak oxygen uptake, %V̇ O2peak) were measured during the last minute of each level.
RESULTS: The data described three-step relationships between dRPE and rpm. RPE-Chest and RPE-Legs increased linearly only for cadences between 60 and 90 rpm (r=0.81 and r=0.88, respectively; p<0.001). At these cadences, significant relationships were also observed between dRPE and all the physiological data (highest Pearson product moment for %V̇ O2peak: 0.81 for RPE-Chest and 0.88 for RPE-Legs, p<0.0001). Last, the classic signal dominance from the legs was observed (RPE-Legs > RPE-Chest, p<0.0001) but was reduced compared with data obtained during dryland cycling, suggesting a modulating effect of the aquatic medium.
CONCLUSIONS: Cycling cadence was the better estimator of RPE-Legs, which seemed to be the more appropriate dRPE to regulate the intensity of aquabiking in a safe range of pedaling rates.


KEY WORDS: Differentiated ratings of perceived exertion; Cycling cadence; Cardiorespiratory responses; Aquatic cycling

top of page