Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > Articles online first > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2020 Nov 04

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe PROMO
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2020 Nov 04

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.20.11321-5

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Investigation into the dynamic visual acuity of skilled cricketers using a continuous motion task

Roberts KELLY, James W. ROBERTS

Psychology, Action and Learning of Movement (PALM) Laboratory, School of Health Sciences, Liverpool, UK


PDF


BACKGROUND: Great demands are imposed upon the perceptual-motor system when undertaking ball-throwing and -hitting tasks including cricket. That is, performers must detect and resolve object details while on the move - something referred to as dynamic visual acuity (DVA). The present study aimed to investigate DVA in skilled cricketers and non-cricketers using a more immediate or real-time assessment.
METHODS: Skilled cricketers and non-cricketers had to detect the presence of the gap within a Landolt-C ring as it moved horizontally or vertically, while progressively increasing the size until the participants registered a response. Measures were taken as the mean (dynamic) minimum angle of resolution of the object size at the moment that participants correctly responded to the gap. Objects would move at either a high, medium or low velocity.
RESULTS: There was greater dynamic visual acuity in the skilled cricketers compared to non-cricketers (p < .05). There was a reduced negative influence of object velocity on dynamic visual acuity in the skilled cricketers compared to non-cricketers (p < .05).
CONCLUSIONS: We suggest these findings contribute to the growing evidence surrounding DVA within ball-throwing and -hitting sports, while making some assertions as to the implications for the cricket performance setting.


KEY WORDS: Ball sports; Perceptual-cognitive; Ocular pursuit; Landolt-C

top of page