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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2020 Jun 23

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.20.10907-1

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Repetitions in reserve vs maximum effort resistance training programs in youth female athletes

Jorge AREDE 1 , Rafael VAZ 2, Oliver GONZALO-SKOK 3, Carlos BALSALOBRE-FERNANDÉZ 4, Daniel VARELA-OLALLA 4, Marc MADRUGA-PARERA 5, Nuno LEITE 1

1 Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development, CIDESD, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal; 2 University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal; 3 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of San Jorge, Zaragoza, Spain; 4 Department of Physical Education, Sport and Human Movement, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain; 5 University School of Health and Sport (EUSES), University of Girona, Girona, Spain


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BACKGROUND: This study aimed to analyze and compare the effects of two different resistance training programs.
METHODS: Fourteen under-17 youth female basketball players were randomly assigned to repetitions in reserve (RIR, n = 7) or maximum effort (RM, n = 7) resistance training programs. The programs consisted of 3-4 sets of 4 exercises x 7-10 repetitions with 2 min of passive recovery between sets and exercises, twice a week for a period of 8 weeks. The RIR group was instructed to perform the exercises with 3 repetitions remaining (rate of perceived exertion [RPE] = 7). The physical assessment included jumping, agility, and sprinting tests. Moreover, the maximum strength (one maximum-repetition [1-RM]) and muscle power output at 60% 1RM were assessed for back-squat and bench-press exercises.
RESULTS: The within-group analysis showed improvements in all tests for both groups (RIR = 1.3-43.9%; RM = 1.3-17.2%). Between-group analyses showed a substantially better performance of the RER group in the countermovement jump (ES = 0.80), V-cut (ES = 0.72), T-test (ES = 1.39), and in the averagepower bench-press (ES = 0.60), and 1RM bench-press (ES = 0.60, p < 0.05). a significant interaction effect (group x time) on 1-RM bench-press (F = 8.07, p < 0.05, η2p = 0.40), favoring RIR group.
CONCLUSIONS: This study reports for the first time that the use of RIR-based RPE resistance training protocol promotes improvements in high-intensity actions (sprinting, jumping, and cutting), muscle power output, and maximum strength, particularly in youth athletes. Considering the advantages of non-failure training, RIR training may be a suitable in-season training strategy. However, more studies are needed to confirm whether the training-induced benefits of this novel training strategy are significantly better as compared to other approaches.


KEY WORDS: Autoregulation; Rating of perceived exertion; One-repetition maximum; Strength exercise; Subjective scales

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